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How to Give a Killer Presentation by Chris Anderson

On the basis of this experience, I’m convinced that giving a good talk in highly coachable. In a matter of hours, a speaker’s content and delivery can be transformed from muddled to mesmerizing. And while my team’s experience has focused on TED’s 18-minutes-or-shorter format, the lessons we’ve learned are surely useful to other presenters – whether it’s a CEO doing an IPO road show, a brand manager unveiling a new product, or a start-up pitching to VCs.

A successful talk is a little miracle people see the world differently afterward.

Frame Your Story

There’s not way you can give a good talk unless you have something worth talking about. Conceptualizing and framing what you want to say is the most vital part of preparation.

As a general rule, people are not very interested in talks about organizations or institutions (unless they’re members of them). Ideas and stories fascinate us; organizations bore us – they’re much harder to relate to. (Business people especially talk note: Don’t boast about your company; rather, tell us about the problem you’re solving.)

Plan your Deliver

Once you’ve got the framing down, it’s time to focus on your delivery. There are three main ways to deliver a talk. You can read it directly off a script or a teleprompter. You can develop a set of bullet points that map out what you’re going to says in each section rather than scripting the whole thing word for word. Or you can memorize your talk, which entails rehearsing it to the point where you internalize every word – verbatim.

Many of our best and most popular TED Talks have been memorized word for word. If you’re giving an important talk and you have the time to do this, it’s the best way to go. But don’t underestimate the work involved. One of our most memorable speakers was Jill Bolte Taylor, a brain researcher who had suffered a stroke. She talked about what she learned during the eight years it took her to recover. After crafting her story and undertaking many hours of solo practice, she rehearsed her talk dozens of times in front of an audience to be sure she had it down.

If a successful talk is a journey, make sure you don’t start to annoy your travel companions along the way. some speakers project too much ego. They sound condescending or full of themselves, and the audience shuts down. Don’t let that happen.

Develop Stage Presence

Perhaps the most important physical act onstage is making eye contact. Find five or six friendly-looking people in different parts of the audience and look them in the eye as you speak. Think of them as friends you haven’t seen in a year, whom you’re bringing up to date on your work.

That eye contact is incredibly powerful, and it will do more than anything else to help your talk land. Even if you don’t have time a script, looking up and making eye contact will make a huge difference.

In general, people worry too much about nervousness. Nerves are not a disaster. The audience experts you to be nervous. It’s a natural body response that can actually improve your performance: It gives you energy to perform and keeps your mind sharp. Just keep breathing, and you’ll be fine.

Nerves are not a disaster. The audience expects you to be nervous.

Plan the Multimedia

With so much technology at our disposal, it may feel almost mandatory to use, at a minimum, presentation slides. By now most people have heard the advice about PowerPoint: Keep it simple; don’t use a slide deck as a substitute for notes(by, say, listing the bullet points you’ll discuss – those are best put on note cards); and don’t repeat out loud words that are on the slide.

Not only is reciting slides a variation of the teleprompter problem—“Oh, no, she’s reading to us, too!”—but information is interesting only once, and hearing and
seeing the same words feels repetitive. That advice may seem universal by now,
but go into any company and you’ll see presenters violating it every day.

Putting It Together

The single most important thing to remember is that there is no one good way
to do a talk. The most memorable talks offer something fresh, something no one has seen before. The worst ones are those that feel formulaic. So do not on any account try to emulate every piece of advice I’ve offered here. Take the bulk of it on board, sure. But make the talk your own. You know what’s distinctive about you and your idea. Play to your strengths and give a talk that is truly authentic to you.

10 Ways to Ruin a Presentation

As hard as it may be to give a great talk, it’s really easy to blow it. Here are some common mistakes that TED advises its speakers to avoid.

  1. Take a really long time to explain what your talk is about.
  2. Speak slowly and dramatically. Why talk when you can orate?
  3. Make sure you subtly let everyone know how important you are.
  4. Refer to your book repeatedly. Even better, quote yourself from it.
  5. Cram your slides with numerous text bullet points and multiple fonts.
  6. Use lots of unexplained technical jargon to make yourself sound smart.
  7. Speak at great length about the history of your organization and its glorious achievements.
  8. Don’t bother rehearsing to check how long your talk is running.
  9. Sound as if you’re reciting your talk from memory.
  10. Never, ever make eye contact with anyone in the audience.

Source: Harvard Business Review

카테고리:미분류

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